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Children's Hospitals around the US At The Breaking Point!


(Colorado children's hospital outside photo statue) can be found here


As many people know flu season is upon the US and much of the globe sees many more viral and bacterial infections. The CDC (Centers For Diseases Control And Prevention) Has said "In the United States, flu season usually occurs in the fall and winter. While influenza viruses spread year-round, flu activity usually peaks between December and February." As I write this article the US is gripped with the start of the flu season, as the US medical systems experience an elevated patient load and more stress on the already pandemic-stressed medical system, the CDC is watching and tracking the progress of the Flu season. The CDC uses many different ways to track the flu season and help to educate the public regarding the dangers of the flu season. The CDC updates a weekly interactive map known as the "FluView Interactive" which shows areas of high viral infection and reveals the number of people that have tested positive for the flu.

The Flu as it is commonly known is referred to as Influenza. Influenza is a highly transmittable respiratory virus. Influenza according to many different health agencies and health systems including the CDC agrees that the primary way Flu is transmitted is throught water droplets that are released when some coughs or sneezes near another person. The idea that the flu is primarily transmitted throught water droplets is backed up by many different articles including the one written by the CDC, titled "How Flu Spreads". The article How Flu Spreads stated that the flu is passed from person to person throught water droplets that can land on a person's mouth and Nose and then be inhaled into the lungs. The CDC article also pointed out that a person who has come into contact with the Flu virus can be contagious one day before showing symptoms, and they can remain contagious for more than seven days after first showing symptoms.

While the flu season is normal and seasonal, the US is now seeing an unusual rise in RSV (Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection) cases that are driving many children and adults to hospitals. The Unusual rise in RSV cases is putting an incredibly large strain on available health resources and staff all while bringing health systems to the breaking point. RSV is similar to Covid and influenza in the way it is transmitted between people, however RSV, unlike influenza and covid, is much deadlier when it infects young children. RSV when it infects children there is an elevated chance that it can cause Bronchiolitis (inflammation of the small airways in the lung) as well as pneumonia (infection of the lungs) in children younger than 1 year. The elevated risk for complications and secondary infections in children, is leading to many children needing to be amidated to hospitals for both standard level of care, and intensive care. The need for intensive care and acute care has become so great that many specialized childrens hospitals are flooded with patients, while other hospitals that are less specialized in childrens care are also becoming overwhelmed with the sheer number of children that need critical care.

(Hospital emergency entrance) the source can be found here,


The US health system has endured the long stress of the covid pandemic over the past years, and now as the US health system faces the flu season the stress on the system has only become worst, as hospitals face critical staffing shortages, supply shortages, and shortages in hospital patient capacity.

As the Flu season continues to drag on, it is unknown as to how long hospitals can hold out, as the flood of patients continues to wear down medical staff and resources.



Jarin Clapp

Senior editor with the Poudre Press, Head writer for OCR News.


Operation Copper Rain started with a dream of making news that was real-time, unbiased news, that could be easily accessed by readers all over the world. With an ongoing mission to uncover facts and find trusted resources, Operation Copper Rain is committed to providing the global population with the latest updates and thought-provoking news.



References

Center for Disease Control. 2022. “How Flu Spreads - How Flu Spreads.” CDC. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/spread.htm.

Centor For Disease control and prevention. 2022. “Flu Season.” CDC. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season.htm.





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